Tuesday, June 28

Ask Your kids Questions part 2

You can find Part One here:

In reading the gospels in the New Testament, we see that questioning was something Jesus did all the time. He asked a lot of questions. We question our kids as we teach them their catechism and then when they bring us questions about life and culture, we ask them questions right back to allow them to think through the answers themselves. Questions are an awesome motivator for thinking and learning, aren't they? We don't want to just hand our kids pat answers, we want them to own the process of thinking through things Biblically.



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My husband Sean and I are believers in Absolute Truth. I know this is an archaic way of thinking. I'm good with being antiquated, it just adds to my charm {wink}. Absolute truth is the belief that there is one absolute truth in life and this truth guides the way we live. Truth isn't determined by our feelings on a topic, our experiences, or our human reasoning. For example, it might seem reasonable for me to divorce Sean if I no longer *feel* love towards him. (Love is an action, not a feeling). As females, not basing our actions or reasoning on our feelings is a difficult thing as the majority of our gender is very much emotionally alive. In life, I have to remind myself constantly to not take things personally, to look at the facts of the relationship between God and I and abandon scrutinizing other people's actions and words. It's not an easy thing, I understand this ~ but if I am challenging my children to choose the harder good over the easier evil, I have to be willing to do this myself.

As a Christian family, we teach our children that the Bible is the inerrant word of God and the basis for the decisions we make in life, the standard to hold up all feelings, experiences and reasoning to. This way of life might not be popular, but I've never seen a life truly surrendered to the gospel regretfully lived.

One thing we've felt the urge to especially teach our children, with the culture around us as it is, specifically church culture, is that we do not pick and choose from the Bible the portions we like and toss the rest because they are inconvenient, uncomfortable or unpopular. Now, please graciously understand that I am not holding myself up as any pillar of excellence. I've seen folks who don't like this way of living pull up an obscure rule from the book of Exodus and say, "well, you don't do this...." as if condemning a human for not living under the law or pointing out human error is justification for abandoning Christianity or church altogether.

*Graciously* is hopefully how we are teaching our children, by example, to treat people who struggle with their relationship with Christ or fully surrendering their lives to Him. Annaliese is old enough and discerns very well when something is off that she hears or sees. She is a very compassionate child and will often remind of the people we need to be pray for and encourage in the Lord.

Jesus made a very important statement that I always point to when this topic comes up. He said that we must be like little children to enter the kingdom of heaven. If I read our Ella a story and tell her it is true, she will accept that. She does not question what my storytelling motives are, or if she should believe the story, nor does she wonder what other people think about the story being true and base her believing on that. She simply believes because she knows me.
This is the heart we strive to teach our children to have towards God and His words in the Bible.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

I love this. Thank you. Melanie M.

amy said...

great thoughts here hannah. oh how i agree with you. it is a hard life to live though isn't it? but oh so important. especially where we are, right here in the liberal non-christian coast of california, we are so strange... (and now being pregnant with #7, oh how dare we?) it is a hard life. but so necessary to model, and live, a life of faith and trust.

Amanda said...

What a great post! I had not thought of asking questions to help children find the answers (with guidance of course). For some reason, our son asks his deepest theological questions, when my husband is no where around. I'm left struggling to come up with a reasonable answer for that a four year old can understand. Some of these are questions theologians have tried to answer for centuries! I just found your blog and am really enjoying it. I can't wait to read more.

Gail @ The Imperfect Housewife said...

What a great reminder the Bible is our Truth. We must teach our kids according to it! Thank you for sharing this! :)

Roslyn said...

Beautiful post. This attitude that you are passing on to your children is sorely missing in the world. Bless you!

Emily said...

Hannah,
I appreciate your post and specifically like your following statement. "One thing we've felt the urge to especially teach our children, with the culture around us as it is, specifically church culture, is that we do not pick and choose from the Bible the portions we like and toss the rest because they are inconvenient, uncomfortable or unpopular."
I do have one personal question,(if I might) are you blessed to fellowship with like minded families that share similar convictions or are you a minority in your home church?
Blessings from Maine,
Emily

Jedidja said...

Hi,

W, my husband and I also teach our children that the Bible is the inerrant word of God and the basis for the decisions we make in life, the standard to hold up all feelings, experiences and reasoning to.

Sometimes it's difficult. My daughter is eleven. She has many questions about the Bible. But the older children are often in discussions about: is anger biblical? And: should I always forgive?

I wish you a "walk with God as Enoch'. And sorry for my poor englisch.

Nicole and Company said...

Lovely post! Yes, I also believe in Absolute Truth. We don't pick and choose from the Bible either. This has been talked about a lot in our family lately...thankfully though it's given me a chance to renew my views and faith.
You and I are of different religions (although both Christian) but I've so enjoyed reading your posts over the years.

Me said...

Thanks, Anonymous. :)

Amy, good for you going against the tide of things to the glory of God! Perhaps California is the only state more liberal than NY? Hmmm....

Amanda, I get those stumping questions all the time and answer them honestly, telling the kids that I am still learning about things too, and we'll ask their Papa about it when he gets home or look it up.

Thank YOU, Gail! :)

Thanks, Roslyn. Love your name, btw. :)

Hello Emily from Maine!
My husband is an elder in our church. I suppose in other churches he might be called a deacon(?) which simply means our church is not run by a board but by an eldership. It is a non-denominational, multi-cultural, active in the city, Christian church. This we love.
With some things we are in the majority, like loving our kiddos and wanting to raise them to have their own relationship w/ the Lord. In other areas, like homeschooling, homesteading, and our beliefs on modesty, we are often the minority. I joke that we are the Amish family at church.

I see that as God is turning the hearts of the father's to their children, more and more families are looking into home education as a way to build into their families and sow into their children - which is so encouraging, as so often homeschooling can be equated with an attempt at self-righteousness.

Hope that answers your question - if you have any further you can email me with the link at the top of the page.

Blessings,
Hannah

Me said...

Jedidja, I think your English is great and you are so correct - kids can come up with the toughest questions!

Nicole and Company, I am so glad you've taken the time to comment. I have many friends from all different denominations and love that we can all glorify Him in heaven one day! Thanks for stopping by!

Blessings,
Hannah